DragonRam Doodles, Australian Labradoodle Breeder in Ottawa ON
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The Adoption Process
for a DragonRam Labradoodle puppy

First steps

The first step in adopting a DragonRam Doodles Labradoodle Puppy is completing our application form.

Once we have received your application form, we will send you an e-mail to let you know we got it. If you do not receive a confirmation e-mail within 48 hours, please call us at 613-552-3066 to ensure it was not overlooked for some reason or lost in cyberspace!

After reviewing the application we will call you or send an e-mail to address any questions or issues with your application, discuss your preference in a puppy, and ensure that what we have coming up is a good match. Once we agree that one of our puppies suits your family, the next steps vary slightly depending whether we have puppies “on the ground” or  we are between litters.

Deposit

If we have puppies available or soon to be born, we will ask you to send in a $500 deposit.

If we are not expecting puppies for a while but you are sure you would like a DragonRam Australian Labradoodle puppy, you can place a $100 “pre-deposit” on the up-coming litter of your choice. We will take four to six pre-deposits on any given litter, depending on whether we plan to keep any puppies and the dam’s track record. (Our average litter is six puppies.) This will hold your place in line for that litter. Once the female is bred and we have a confirmed puppy count by ultrasound at four weeks’ gestation, those with pre-deposits will need to put down the remaining $400 of the deposit to hold their place in line. If there are not enough puppies (or if the dam fails to gets pregnant, which has happened to us twice), families will have the option to transfer their deposit to a different litter, receive a refund, or (if they live in the Ottawa area and we are keeping Australian Labradoodle breeding puppies from this or another litter) become a Guardian family for a breeding prospect Australian Labradoodle puppy.

Puppy visits

At any point during this process, you are welcome to join us on our Doodle Romps, where we get together with our former pups and their families for some social time and a walk through the neigbouring (urban) forest and fields. This is a great opportunity to see the dogs in action, get a first-hand look at the variety of colours and sizes, and chat with other Labradoodle lovers! We host Doodle Romps three to four times a year, including an indoor winter social at a local dog-training facility. Our DragonRam Labrddoodle Romps may be announced on Facebook or our Blog, or you can send an e-mail and ask to be kept informed.

After the puppies are born, you can follow their progress through the (more or less) weekly updates we post on Facebook!

Given the number of Australian Labradoodle litters and puppies we have, and the logistics of managing a breeding business sand a busy family life, we limit visits with the puppies. We will invite families with a deposit to visit on a given day when the puppies are at between four and six weeks old. Subsequent visits will be part of the allocation process. If you have not placed a deposit, we might be able to accommodate a special visit but don’t count on it. You can always come to one of our Romps for a “meet-the-breeder” visit.

Puppy allocation

Many people come to us saying “I’d like a light-coloured dog” or “the puppy has to be female” or “we’d like a dog about 30 lbs” or the like. For our part, however, we focus on matching the temperament of the dog to the lifestyle of the family. Colour, sex, and size are “first impression” external features. But what if that “perfect” puppy with all the right physical characteristics is a lively, energetic, go-getter when you  really want a snuggly lap-warmer? It’s a recipe for disaster. So, while we will accept your indications of your preferred colour, sex and size, the questions on our application form focus on temperament, lifestyle, favourite activities and so on.

So, you ask, how can we possibly know at such a young age which Australian Labradoodle puppy will have the best temperament for your family? If you’re a parent, you know that you kid’s character comes through pretty early! When the puppies are seven weeks old, we bring in a dog behaviourist who runs each puppy through a set of simple exercises and observes how they react. With her in-depth knowledge of dog behaviour and her ability to read their body language, she can quickly determine the puppy’s social characteristics and focus. She writes up a report on each pup.

Using this information,  we match the pup’s temperament to your family’s lifestyle. Starting with the first family on our reserve list, we give you a choice of two puppies that we believe are the best match for you. Once the first family has made their selection, we move down the list. Note, however, that every family’s needs and preferences are kept in mind from the beginning, so being the last on the list does not mean you won’t get the best Australian Labradoodle puppy for you.

Also between six and eight weeks of age, the puppies will have their first vaccinations (6-7 weeks old) and be neutered (7-9 weeks old). At this young age, they bounce back from surgery very quickly - a day later, you’d hardly know they just had surgery! We will also send you a copy of the draft contract and health guarantee for your review.

Pick-up time!

Finally, after weeks (if not months) of anticipation, the days comes to pick up your puppy! At this point you will need to make the final payment. If we need to ship the puppy to you, payment must be received prior to shipment. The cost of shipping is extra and must also be paid in advance.

When you pick up your Australian Labradoodle puppy, count on 30-45 minutes to review and sign the contract, fill out the microchip form, and review care and feeding instructions. As part of the puppy pack, you will also receive vaccination and neuter certificates, a couple toys, a leash, a sample of tinned food, some poop bags, and a blanket with the scent of their littermates on it, to help provide some “home comfort” as they adjust to life with your family.